InStyle: Jennifer Garner on the Choices that Have Defined Her Career

Jennifer is part of InStyle magazine’s 25th anniversary issue!

My first InStyle cover was in 2004. I cut my bangs for the shoot in Hawaii, which was not very nice because I was in the middle of an Alias episode. I came back to L.A., and I was like, “Oh, I have bangs now.” Rude! Unprofessional! But I really love that young girl on the cover. Bless her buttons. I had been working professionally in the industry for 11 years, and I thought, “Wow, I have been through some things.” I thought I’d been around the block. Fifteen years later I realize, “My god, I hadn’t even been through anything bad yet.” My life is so intact, and I have so much respect for how fragile that is.

I feel a lot less stressed about the industry and my place in it now than I used to. When you’re one of the “hot girls” of the moment, you’re making choices that define you. I was defined first by choosing to go on hiatus, and then I was very quickly defined by pregnancies and babies. Now my choices are defined by different things. I don’t have the offers coming at me that I had during that first cover, but I know that what does come my way is because someone really wants to see me take a shot at a role.

Early on in my career I realized I was attracted to projects that weren’t your run-of-the-mill movies. There were a ton of big hits that I would have loved to have done, but those scripts weren’t coming to me. I look at all six of my InStyle covers, and I was promoting films like Butter, The Kingdom, Catch and Release, and The Odd Life of Timothy Green. They’re movies that no one has heard of. They’re not big blockbusters or Oscar movies. But everyone who did see them, a combined total of 25 people, really loved them. They’re all pretty quirky—even 13 Going on 30 was a quirky choice to make at the time; it wasn’t a hot script being pursued by many people — and they all just require accepting the world from a different angle. That common thread makes me realize that I know myself. I am who I am.

I’ve always pursued other interests outside of acting too. In 2008 I started working for Save the Children to help kids growing up poor in rural America. I thought I’d be going to school-age programs, but Mark Shriver — who’s been my boss there for 11 years — said, “If you want to help kids growing up poor, you have to help them starting at birth.” So I got involved in early-childhood education, and I’ve learned so much about brain development. I wish I could go back to do it all again with my kids and fix whatever I’m sure I screwed up. [laughs]

It’s so gnarly to be a kid now. I guard my kids’ privacy as much as I possibly can, and I’ve never posted pictures of them on Instagram. I used to refuse to say their names during interviews — but everyone knows their names! I would just say “my eldest,” which I still do out of habit a lot. I’m sure there are times my kids would really love to see themselves reflected on my social media in a fun way and to have the attention they would get from that. But I’ve fought too hard against it. It would feel hypocritical. There’s no implied judgment of people who do put their kids up there; I just don’t think most kids have been hounded in the way that mine were when they were little. We were completely hounded 24/7 for 10 solid years, and it changes you. You no longer take things like being able to go to your mailbox for granted. I even stopped going to the farmers market because I was being photographed there constantly. I realized, “I’m ruining the farmers market for everyone; this is selfish.” [laughs]

I’m grateful I came up when I did and I didn’t have to deal with social media. It’s a whole other job. I know, cry me a river. But I’m glad we didn’t have the pressure on us that girls have now. I was such a baby about having to join [Instagram] — I kicked and screamed. Whatever I post has to feel authentic to me, like getting dressed for a red carpet. You’re in control of whatever you’re putting out there, and it’s got to be you. My stylist showed up today in something I could never pull off in my entire life — because I’m just not that cool — and she said, “Well, I would never bring it to you. I know you better than that.”

Close female friendships are everything to me. I’m still friends with the same people I was when I shot my InStyle covers. I’ve spoken to most of them in the last 48 hours. So I feel pretty lucky as far as the girlfriend thing is concerned. The few times I’ve been able to get together with groups of women thanks to #MeToo and Time’s Up, it’s been life-changing. I used to see Reese [Witherspoon] mainly because we have sons the same age. But she was really the only person in that kind of position in Hollywood that I could call. Now there are so many other women in the industry I can reach out to. Feeling like part of a whole instead of thinking “Oh my gosh, I’d better hold on to my spot as tightly as I can or we’ll all be subsumed” has been the hugest gift and the biggest game changer.

It’s important to find the beauty in everything, even when it’s hard. Looking back at my earlier InStyle cover shoots, especially the one [from 2005] when I was pregnant for the first time, I was naïvely confident that everything would be fine. I knew nothing, and I still know nothing. But now I know that I know nothing. And I’m comfortable with that.

How I’d describe myself:
In 2004: Optimistic, Empowered, Flat-stomached
Today: Optimistic, Humbled, Seeking wisdom, Grateful

Source: InStyle.com

Stars Announced For Save The Children Centennial Events

Save the Children, the international humanitarian organization, announced today that Jennifer Garner will host its “Centennial Celebration: Once in a Lifetime” event on October 2 in Beverly Hills, with a special performance by five-time Grammy Award winner James Taylor.

Tommy Hilfiger, founder of Tommy Hilfiger, will be honored at “The Centennial Gala: Changing The World for Children” gala in New York City on September 12. To help celebrate the night in New York, chef and humanitarian José Andrés will create a special dessert for guests to enjoy. As previously announced, the two events are a culmination of the organization’s 100th year anniversary and will celebrate Save the Children’s mission to do whatever it takes for the most vulnerable children in the United States and around the world.

As previously announced, Save the Children will also host a second centennial celebration on October 2 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. Save the Children Trustee and actor Jennifer Garner will host the event, which will honor The Walt Disney Company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Robert A. Iger with The Centennial Award. Special guest Oprah Winfrey will present the award to Mr. Iger. The West Coast event will be a night to remember with performances by James Taylor and the Amani Children’s Choir from Uganda. Attendees will be treated to a dessert specially created for the event by renowned chef Wolfgang Puck.

“By continuing to advocate for the rights of children globally, Tommy Hilfiger has not only become a notable humanitarian figure, but he has built a brand based on corporate responsibility. We’re looking forward to honoring him for those efforts in New York in September,” said Carolyn Miles, CEO of Save the Children. “And while Jennifer Garner, a Save the Children trustee, has hosted previous galas, we are thrilled to have her serve as the host of our first West Coast celebration in October. She is deeply committed to issues affecting children and most recently brought hope and joy to children recently released from government custody benefitting from Save the Children’s Child Friendly Spaces in hospitality centers in New Mexico.”

Over the past 100 years, Save the Children has changed the lives of far more than 1 billion children, reaching 134 million children in 2018 alone. As the world’s leading expert on children, with operations in 120 countries including the United States, Save the Children has an unparalleled ability not only to develop and test innovations, but also to dramatically scale what works – creating lasting, transformative change for children. In commemoration of the 100th anniversary, Save the Children launched The Promise of Childhood Campaign, a fundraising effort to raise $100 million to accelerate their work today and ensure their programs for tomorrow.

For more information on the West Coast event, please visit www.savethechildren.org/Celebration

Source: Look to the Stars

‘A Very Bad Day’ Captures

The gallery was updated several days ago with HQ captures of A Very Bad Day (aka A Happening of Monumental Proportions); the Judy Greer directed movie, where Jen had a small & very expressive part. The movie was filmed back in 2017. Gallery link & previews are below, enjoy!

Gallery Link
Captures | The Film

‘Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day’ Captures

Over 900 blu-ray captures from Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) have also been added to the gallery; link & previews are below, enjoy!

Gallery Link
Captures | The Film

‘Daredevil’ Captures & Extras

I am slowly adding the older content to the gallery. Today, I’ve added captures from Daredevil (2003) & the extras — the movie captures shall be upgraded in the future. Gallery links & previews are below, enjoy!

Gallery Links
Captures | The Film
Special Features | Beyond Hell’s Kitchen
Special Features | HBO Special
Special Features | Multi Angle Dailies
Special Features | Screen Test
Special Features | Stills